Professional development in wildlife ecology and management: A one-stop shop


I’ve written occasionally on the The Waterthrush Blog about various topics to help students succeed through their undergraduate coursework, find opportunities for research and field experience, pursue graduate school, etc. The advice I have to offer comes uniquely though the lens of my personal experiences as someone poor, ill-prepared, and ignorant of the path I needed to follow, but ultimately successful in realizing my goal as a research/teaching professor at a large university. My views are heavily biased but do provide the perspective of remembering what it felt like to be a struggling undergraduate student while today working to mentor students trying to navigate similar struggles. (Also, a lot of my examples focus on building a career in ornithology, but don’t let the specific subject matter distract you from the broader messages.)

This post is simply an effort to consolidate links to others on relevant topics so it’s a bit easier for folks to find potentially helpful content. If there’s a theme to any of these posts, it lies in my desire to make plain the things I wish were made plain to me, long before I ultimately figured them out.

  1. How to achieve academic success in college.
  2. How to write a cover letter.
  3. What’s undergraduate research about, and how can I do it?
  4. Building competency in natural resources.
  5. This is how you go to graduate school.
  6. You can train yourself toward more effective productivity.
  7. Hiring? Recommendation letters suck, so don’t ask for them.
  8. Where should we try to publish?
  9. Social media and academia?
  10. Uprooting for a faculty job.
  11. Sometimes PhDs wear funny robes. Here’s how to do it on the cheap.
This entry was posted in academics, career, editorial, life, mentoring, professional development and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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